Redshift Blender

Posted : admin On 15.08.2021

In this tutorial we'll take a quick overview of the Material Blender function in Redshift, set up a quick example and discuss some use cases for the techniqu. Jan 31, 2021 In November 2020, Redshift is the latest name in a growing list of “industry-standard” renderers to join the roster of render engines with official blender support. Its latest 3.0.33 release brings with it the first public beta release of its long-awaited Blender plugin among a host of new features. This shader allows you to combine the results of up to 4 bump, normal and round corners shader nodes. The output of this shader is a displacement vector, which when attached to the material bump-map input will result in a perturbed normal. With the release of the Redshift for Blender plug-in I decided to make a quick intro video on how to install the plug-in. In this particular case I.


Maxon has released the first public beta builds of both the new Blender integration plugin for Redshift, its GPU production renderer, and for the new Metal-native version of Redshift for current Macs.

Both open betas are available with Redshift 3.0.33, the latest version of the software.

New Blender integration plugin makes it possible to use Redshift with the open-source 3D software
Announced earlier this year, the long-awaited Blender integration plugin makes it possible to use Redshift natively with the open-source 3D software.

The integration uses Blender’s Python API, and features “pretty much identical” render options to those of the other 3D applications Redshift supports, although it’s still very much a work in progress.

Features not currently supported include proxies, texture baking, light linking, point clouds, motion blur and denoising using Redshift’s OptiX and Altus denoisers.

In addition, there is only “basic” support for AOVs – neither Cryptomatte ID matte generation or DeepEXR export is currently available – and only the perspective and orthogonal cameras are supported.

The integration is also currently only avaiable on Windows and Linux, although Maxon comments in the release thread on its forum that work on a macOS edition will start “hopefully soon”.



Long-awaited Metal version of Redshift works with AMD GPUs in new Macs
There is better news for Mac users running Cinema 4D, Houdini or Maya, with the release of the new Metal-native edition of Redshift in open beta.

Originally announced at Apple’s Worldwide Developer Conference last year, the port from Nvidia’s CUDA to Apple’s Metal as a GPU computing API will enable Redshift to run properly on current Mac workstations.

Apple no longer supports Nvidia cards, even as eGPUs, and in any case, CUDA no longer supports macOS.

The new open beta requires macOS 11.0 Big Sur, released publicly last week; and either an AMD Navi or Vega GPU, AMD’s current- and next-generation graphics cards.

That means a machine less than three years old: Navi GPUs first became available in Mac desktops in late 2017 with the iMac Pro, reaching Mac laptops the following year.

Maxon says that it is “working with Apple and AMD” to determine whether AMD’s older Polaris GPUs can be supported in future with “reasonable performance”.

Also new in Redshift 3.0.33: better render denoising, extended support for Houdini
Other changes in Redshift 3.0.33 include support for Object Trace Sets and for portal and mesh lights when running Redshift as a Hydra render delegate within Houdini.

All users can now perform temporal denoising using the Altus denoiser from the command line.

Since we last covered the software, the Redshift 3.0 releases have gone from experimental builds to (semi-)official production versions.

Redshift Blender

While not all of the features originally planned for the 3.0 release series have yet been implemented, Redshift 3.0.33 can now be downloaded directly from the product website, alongside Redshift 2.6.56.

Pricing and system requirements
The new Blender integration plugin and Metal edition of Redshift are available with Redshift 3.0.33. Both are currently still in beta.

Redshift 3.0.33 is available for 64-bit Windows 7+, glibc 2.17+ Linux and macOS 10.12-10.13 on Nvidia GPUs, or macOS 11.0 on AMD GPUs. It costs $500 for a node-locked licence; $600 for a floating licence.

The integration plugins are compatible with 3ds Max 2014+, Blender 2.90, Cinema 4D R17+, Houdini 17.0+ (18.0+ on macOS), Katana 3.0v1+ and Maya 2014+ (2016.5+ on macOS).


Read more about the new Blender plugin for Redshift on the product forums
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Read more about the open beta of the Metal port of Redshift on the product forums
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Tags: 3ds max, AMD GPU, Big Sur, Blender, Cinema 4D, CUDA, download link, Houdini, integration plugin, Katana, macOS 11.0, Maxon, Maya, Metal, Navi, new features, Nvidia GPU, open beta, Polaris, price, Redshift, Redshift 3.0.33, Redshift for Metal, Redshift Rendering Technologies, system requirements, Vega

Concept artist and matte painter Saul Espinosa‘s round-up of the new features in Redshift 3.0 announced during Maxon’s 3D and Motion Design Show last week. The recording of the livestream starts at 03:30.


Maxon has shown sneak peeks of Redshift, its GPU renderer, running under Metal on current Mac hardware, and of Redshift RT, its new real-time hybrid ray tracing/rasterisation render engine.

Both are due in public preview later this year, alongside a new Redshift integration plugin for Blender.

The news was announced during Maxon’s 3D and Motion Design Show, in what would normally have been Siggraph 2020 week, alongside Project: Neutron, Cinema 4D’s new node-based core architecture.

Redshift on Metal: new Mac port of the renderer due with the public beta of macOS 11.0
During the livestream, Maxon previewed the new Metal port of Redshift for users of current Apple hardware.

Announced at Apple’s Worldwide Developer Conference last year, the switch from Nvidia’s CUDA to Apple’s Metal as a GPU computing API will enable Redshift to run properly on current Mac workstations.

Apple no longer supports Nvidia cards, even as eGPUs, and in any case, CUDA no longer supports macOS.

You can see the upcoming Metal port at 04:40 in the video above, running the standard Redshift benchmark scene inside Cinema 4D on an iMac Pro.

According to Maxon, registered Redshift users will be able to test a preview build in the “next couple of weeks”, although the exact timing depends on that of the public beta of macOS 11.0 Big Sur.

The other key Metal-native GPU renderer for Mac users, Otoy’s Octane X, which was also announced at WWDC 2019, has just been released as a free public preview.



Redshift RT: new real-time hybrid render engine due later this year
In addition, Maxon previewed Redshift RT, Redshift’s new real-time render engine.

A hybrid ray tracing/rasterisation engine, it provides near-real-time feedback on complex production scenes, supporting the same materials and lights as the main Redshift renderer.

The demo, which you can see at 05:20 in the video, showed Nvidia’s open-source Attic USD test scene inside Redshift for Maya, running on a Razer gaming laptop with a Nvidia GeForce GTX 2080 Mobile GPU.

Interactive performance in Redshift RT is noticeably better than in Redshift’s existing interactive render preview, and the resulting image is less noisy.

Maxon described RT as generating “pretty clean results almost instantly”, even with full global illumination.

Redshift RT is still “in active development”, with an initial alpha release due later this year.


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Redshift Blender Download


Redshift for Blender: new Blender integration plugin due in the ‘next few weeks’
Maxon also confirmed that the new Redshift integration plugin for Blender is coming up for release as part of the ongoing series of experimental public builds of Redshift 3.0, the next major version of the software.

Maxon redshift

Redshift Blender Demo

Support for Open Shading Language (OSL) is due “in the next few weeks” with “initial Blender support … soon thereafter”.

You can see an alpha build of the Blender plugin – which already supports displacement, instancing, volumes and the Blender hair object – in the video above, recorded by concept artist Saul Espinosa.

Features already available in public builds include support for GPU-accelerated ray tracing via Nvidia’s OptiX 7 platform and support for NVLink. You can find more details in our original story on Redshift 3.0.

Pricing and system requirements
Experimental builds of Redshift 3.0 are available to registered users of the software for Windows, Linux and macOS. Redshift hasn’t yet announced a date for the official release yet.

The current stable release, Redshift 2.6, costs $500 for a node-locked licence; $600 for a floating licence. Integrations are available for 3ds Max 2014+, Cinema 4D R16+, Houdini 16.5+, Katana 2.6v1+ and Maya 2014+.

Redshift Blender Reviews


Find more details of the new features in Redshift 3.0 on the product forums
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See the current status of the Metal port of Redshift on the product forums
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Redshift Blender Mac

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